High Speed Sewing Machines

High-speed Sewing machines have become common to the list of household equipment. Even homeowners who don’t sew often feel it’s useful to have one around because it guarantees fast, neat and accurate stitching, lasts for years and is available in different models.

In the past, manual machines were the […]

High-speed Sewing machines have become common to the list of household equipment. Even homeowners who don't sew often feel it's useful to have one around because it guarantees fast, neat and accurate stitching, lasts for years and is available in different models.

In the past, manual machines were the norm. They still are, in fact, for people who don't want to trade their trusty machines for newer, electric-operated ones. But irrespective of which you choose, it's important to go for a quality model that's manufactured by old companies noted for producing durable machines. 

High Speed Sewing Machines Types


Electric: Electric-operated machines don't have a hand wheel as a motor drives the needle and controls the feed dog and the bobbin. A foot pedal pushes the motor and has variable speed. The harder it's pushed, the faster you can sew.

Electric machines outperform manual models in many areas. They also have fewer problems and those that do usually have to do with the motor which is replaceable. Speed and accuracy are high which benefits users who do a lot of sewing.

Computerized: Similar to electric machines but superior in many ways is the computerized sewing machine. It sews like others but is programmable to output different stitches. A memory function also allows it to remember past work for application in future jobs. Computerized Sewing Machines

The most expensive consumer-grade model, a computerized machine is a perfect solution for homeowners who want to produce fine and varied stitches or small business owners dealing in sewing garments. Even embroidery work can be done.

The price of a computerized machine may seem high, but the returns are even higher. This bodes well if you're looking to make a profit from sewing professionally.

Overlocker: Clothing that needs a neat and fine finish around the edges can be subjected to the workings of an overlocker machine. Designed specifically for use for hemming, seaming, and edging, they should be used together with electric or computerized machines if you're sewing for a living.

Embroidery: Embroidery machines - most of them computerized now - pattern embroideries in a fashion difficult to accomplish by hand. Of course, good handwork is still considered superior and fetches more money, but for moderate to high volume productions, they're the only way to get results quickly.Patterns are uploaded into the machine, and as long as it's able to replicate them, there's no end to what designs can be reproduced. Embroidery Machines

What to look for in a machine

Before purchasing any model, find out the basics of a sewing machine, its parts, its common problems and how to deal with them. Local dealers are the best source of purchase because help is only a phone call away. Find out the reputation of the dealer -local or online - as well as return policies, warranty, and guarantee. Look for features you want the machine to have even if it means you end up spending a bit more. Sewing Machines